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5 things you need to know about the future of cybersecurity

  • Their discussions included Daesh’s media strategy, the rise of new forms of online attacks, how to protect infrastructure, the threat of pandemics and the dangers of hiring a nanny based on her Salvation Army uniform.
  • The power of the dark webDaesh may be losing the ground war but the virtual caliphate’s online branding and propaganda is still winning converts, Charlie Winter, senior research fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, told the room.Winter spends hours monitoring jihadist chat on encrypted messaging app…
  • Read next – – In a bid to keep the internet open, Cloudflare, which supplies online security to companies large and small, has launched Project Galileo, which mitigates DDoS attacks.
  • We must stay alert to new types of attacksThere is a new kind of online attack known as pseudo-ransomware – and it has even outraged some hacker groups, Raj Samani, chief scientist at McAfee, warned the conference.Samani classified WannaCry – the May 2017 virus that crippled the NHS – and…
  • How to close the online trust gapWhen Rachel Botsman’s parents advertised for a nanny, they were taken in by a woman called Doris’s Salvation Army uniform, thick glasses and Scottish accent, the author and lecturer told the room.

From the online trust gap to the power of the dark web, here’s what we learned from this year’s WIRED Security event

Nick D Burton

Terrorism researchers, AI developers, government scientists, threat-intelligence specialists, investors and startups gathered at the second annual WIRED conference to discuss the changing face of online security. These are the people who are keeping you safe online. Their discussions included Daesh’s media strategy, the rise of new forms of online attacks, how to protect infrastructure, the threat of pandemics and the dangers of hiring a nanny based on her Salvation Army uniform.

1.The power of the dark webDaesh may be losing the ground war but the virtual caliphate’s online branding and propaganda is still winning converts, Charlie Winter, senior research fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, told the room.Winter spends hours monitoring jihadist chat on encrypted messaging app Telegram – the new home of the virtual caliphate. Its complex propaganda machine involves “hundreds and hundreds of media products, videos, magazines and bulletins, in lots of different languages coming out every single day”, he explained. “Daesh supporters are addicted to its propaganda and the group tries to propagate that interdependence.”Winter suggested partially closing the network to make it more difficult. That could mean making parts of the internet inhospitable, but “not so much that they start using things impossible to monitor”, he added.

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5 things you need to know about the future of cybersecurity

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