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Chirp and its data over sound pitch for the industrial IoT

  • Teamed up with AI and voice recognition it’s now supposed to be an important way forward for just about every application that might have a human listening at one end and the cloud pitching in at the other…  isn’t that right Alexa?
  • Alexa has probably been talking with Moran Lerner, CEO of Chirp, self-described  global leader in ‘data over sound’ technology.
  • Chirp is a sort of ‘back to the future’ play, encoding data onto sound modulations in either the audible frequency ranges (which can be useful when used across equipment designed to deal with voice) and inaudible “near ultrasonic pitches” to form what Chirp calls a “sonic barcode”.
  • Any device with a speaker can emit a Chirp and most devices with a microphone and a small amount of processing power can receive and decode it,” says the blurb.
  • According to Moran the idea is not to compete with established short range radio protocols, such as Bluetooth, but to slip Chirp into the mix where it might be appropriate for a particular application where the conventional systems aren’t up to it.

Data over sound technology looks to find a working role in the IoTChirp claims a head start on its rivals for encoding soundClaims will work to solve real prob…

One of the things that 2017 is turning out to be is the year of interactive voice. Teamed up with AI and voice recognition it’s now supposed to be an important way forward for just about every application that might have a human listening at one end and the cloud pitching in at the other…  isn’t that right Alexa?

She says, “Yes, but the developments don’t only involve mere humans, you know. Gadgets are becoming important sound users as well.”

Alexa has probably been talking with Moran Lerner, CEO of Chirp, self-described  global leader in ‘data over sound’ technology. Moran heads up an impressive 12-strong (at the moment) technology team, based in London and is fast developing a large B2B client base for the technology.

Many of us remember the humble modem. Chirp is a sort of ‘back to the future’ play, encoding data onto sound modulations in either the audible frequency ranges (which can be useful when used across equipment designed to deal with voice) and inaudible “near ultrasonic pitches” to form what Chirp calls a “sonic barcode”.

“Data is encoded on a sending device before being transmitted, over the air, to a receiving device, or group of devices where it is decoded. Any device with a speaker can emit a Chirp and most devices with a microphone and a small amount of processing power can receive and decode it,” says the blurb.

According to Moran the idea is…

Chirp and its data over sound pitch for the industrial IoT