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DIY Home Automation

DIY Home Automation  #IIoT #IoT #IoE #InternetOfThings

  • The overall category of devices that I use are the Internet of Things (IoT). ”
  • However, IoT is increasingly becoming part of the consumer lexicon!!

Home Automation DIY Case Study
The following is from a Mind Commerce interview with residential owner/installer/operator: 
“ I got into the…

@DavidOro: DIY Home Automation #IIoT #IoT #IoE #InternetOfThings

“ I got into the home automation craze by accident when one of my managers described what he was doing.  After looking at it, the added convenience, security, and cost savings made me a believer.  The overall category of devices that I use are the Internet of Things (IoT). ”

I have an Amazon Echo that allows me to issue voice commands to the majority of my IoT devices.  It also will play music from my Amazon Prime account and allow me to order merchandise (all voice of course).  It additionally allows me to keep a TODO and shopping list that is synchronized to my Alexa app on my iPhone.  As I think of items, I just tell Alexa (the name for the Echo), and she will add the items to the list.  I use this all the time.  You can also set timers and alarms vocally, which is another well-used feature.  There’s tons more.  The Echo talks WiFi.

I use a Wink Hub to interface the Echo to devices that don’t directly talk over WiFi, or that the Echo doesn’t directly support.  The Wink Hub talks Z-Wave, Zigbee, WiFi, and Lutron’s proprietary communications (dimmers).  The Wink Hub also has a nice APP that lets me control everything directly from my cellphone if I want.

I use Luton dimmers that allow me to turn on, turn off, or set the dimming level for my most commonly used lights.  The echo supports this so I can say “Alexa set living room lights to XX%” and it happens.

I have a Rain Machine which is a connected sprinkler controller.  I can turn on stations from the Echo, but I don’t.  What it allows me to do is to set the watering parameters and then it connects to NOAA and it will modify my preferences based on how much rain has fallen.  Money saver.  It has a great APP and will tell me how much each station actually watered per week.  A real money saver in Florida.

The Ecobee 3 thermostat was an expensive but awesome IoT purchase that also saved me a lot of money this past winter.  It is very smart and connects to the Echo directly (WiFi).  I can tell Alexa to raise or lower the temperature by voice.  Setup couldn’t be any simpler, and the APP is awesome.  Conventional wisdom in the winter is to lower your temperature at night and then have it increase before you wake to save money.  Wrong!  The Ecobee tracks when your fan and compressor run (view on the website).  I found out that turning the temperature down by 4 degrees overnight was causing my heat strips (expensive) to turn on for a couple of hours around 5AM to bring the temperature back up.  I was much better off just leaving it one degree less all the time.

For my garage door controller, I bought an IoT box that allows me to view the status of the garage door and to remotely open or close the door by using the Wink APP.  Really nice when I can’t remember if I closed the door, or left it open.  This doesn’t work with the Echo by design (having a crook yell into your house “Alexa open the garage door” wouldn’t be a good thing).

Nest Cam is an awesome security device.  When I’m on travel I can view what’s going on in the house and even hear what’s going on.  It’s got 1080p resolution and night IR capability (see at night with the lights off).  I can even talk to my cat through it.  I pay for the cloud recording service, so when it’s on, a month of recording is held on the cloud, which would be useful if the house is ever robbed.  The problem is I don’t want it recording while I’m home.  That is solved by…

Leviton makes smart bricks that plug into an outlet and let you plug an appliance (anything) into it and control that appliance on/off state through Wink or the Echo.  So when I leave, I can just vocally tell the Nest Cam to turn on, or if I forget, I can just use the Wink APP to turn it on remotely.  I use these to control the Nest Cam, my DirecTV internet device, and my Amazon Fire TV.  Whey have them sucking energy all the time when I use them maybe 2% of the time? “

DIY Home Automation