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Pokitto Heads to Kickstarter – Hackster’s Blog

Pokitto is a 32-bit DIY gaming console that teaches how IoT devices work:

  • Pokitto Heads to KickstarterWith computing power becoming ever smaller and less expensive, the possibilities for small IoT and computing devices are becoming more and more accessible.
  • Throwing its hat into the ring is the Pokitto.This DIY gaming and IoT device resembles a small Game Boy, and uses an NXP ARM Cortex-M0+ core for processing.
  • Additionally, it has a GPIO connector on the top as well as a 600 mAh battery, potentially making it a powerful and portable IoT tool.The Pokitto connects to a tablet or computer for programming, and uses online programming tools, so no software installation is needed on the host computer.
  • Users can take advantage of a library of open source games and applications, then look at how they are coded to build their own versions.
  • Libraries are available for graphics, music, physics, and gaming, and applications can be simulated on a PC before loading onto the gadget.If, however, you do manage to make a mistake, the Pokitto can be restored to a working status using its built-in ROM, so there is nothing to fear.Want to see it for yourself, or perhaps even try it out?

With computing power becoming ever smaller and less expensive, the possibilities for small IoT and computing devices are becoming more and more accessible. Throwing its hat into the ring is the…

@Hacksterio: Pokitto is a 32-bit DIY gaming console that teaches how IoT devices work:

With computing power becoming ever smaller and less expensive, the possibilities for small IoT and computing devices are becoming more and more accessible. Throwing its hat into the ring is the Pokitto.

This DIY gaming and IoT device resembles a small Game Boy, and uses an NXP ARM Cortex-M0+ core for processing. It features a 2” color LCD display, along with a speaker and headphone jack for output. Additionally, it has a GPIO connector on the top as well as a 600 mAh battery, potentially making it a powerful and portable IoT tool.

The Pokitto connects to a tablet or computer for programming, and uses online programming tools, so no software installation is needed on the host computer. Users can take advantage of a library of open source games and applications, then look at how they are coded to build their own versions. Libraries are available for graphics, music, physics, and gaming, and applications can be simulated on a PC before loading onto the gadget.

If, however, you do manage to make a mistake, the Pokitto can be restored to a working status using its built-in ROM, so there is nothing to fear.

Want to see it for yourself, or perhaps even try it out? The Pokitto team will be at the Maker Faire Bay Area this May, so be sure to say “hello!” Until then, you can check out their Kickstarter page here.

Pokitto Heads to Kickstarter – Hackster’s Blog