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Hacking via the Internet of Things

.@ReutersGraphics explains how hackers target the Internet of Things:

  • After viruses infected computers in the late 1990s, software makers invested in making their products more secure.
  • Computer users are wiser about the dangers and how to protect themselves from losing data or being mobile devices proliferated in the past decade, hackers have focused on trying to gain access.
  • While infections remain relatively small, the sheer number of mobile devices mean mobile malware can be a lucrative Internet of Things is now also attracting the attention of hackers and cybercriminals.
  • Devices from cars to consumer electronics, which were first thought to be of little interest to hackers, now raise more cybersecurity concerns.

Diagrams explaining the cybersecurity risks the Internet of Things(IoT) is facing and how the DDoS attack is launched.

@ReutersTech: .@ReutersGraphics explains how hackers target the Internet of Things:

The Internet of Things, or IoT, is a term used to describe devices connecting to the internet that aren’t primarily computers — anything from a hydroelectric turbine to a toaster. There are billions of such devices and because of poor security practices they’re increasingly becoming the target of hackers: especially those wanting to create a network of compromised devices, or botnet.

After viruses infected computers in the late 1990s, software makers invested in making their products more secure. Computer users are wiser about the dangers and how to protect themselves from losing data or being hacked.

As mobile devices proliferated in the past decade, hackers have focused on trying to gain access. While infections remain relatively small, the sheer number of mobile devices mean mobile malware can be a lucrative business.

The Internet of Things is now also attracting the attention of hackers and cybercriminals. Devices from cars to consumer electronics, which were first thought to be of little interest to hackers, now raise more cybersecurity concerns.

Computer users are now wiser about the dangers of viruses and how to protect themselves from losing data or being hacked. Infections in mobile devices also remain relatively small. However, the Internet of Things is now attracting the attention of hackers and cybercriminals.

Hackers exploit the weak security and 24-hour connectivity of the consumer devices, like toasters, washers and webcams, to recruit them into botnets, which are used to launch attacks on other targets. While the devices themselves have only limited computing power and memory, they can still be harnessed together to create a formidable army of robot devices.

Hackers do this by automatically scanning the internet for devices protected by default or easily crackable passwords which they can recruit to their botnet. The hacker can then leverage the botnet to launch attacks on other devices, in what is called a distributed denial of service attack, or DDoS, which attempts to knock a website offline by flooding its DNS provider with traffic.

The compromised devices in the botnet can also be used to hack into devices on the same network, stealing sensitive data or facilitating other malicious activities.

Hacking via the Internet of Things

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